Photo of Katy Proudfoot

Katy Proudfoot

  • Assistant Professor, Veterinary Preventive Medicine
    The Ohio State University
  • Most Common Publication Keywords # of Pubs
  • CATTLE3
  • PARTURITION3
  • CALVING MANAGEMENT2
  • HEALTH2
  • LABOR2
  • TRANSITION2
  • ACUTE-PHASE RESPONSE1
  • BEHAVIOR1
  • BOVINE RESPIRATORY-DISEASE1
  • CELL-MEDIATED-IMMUNITY1
  • Most Common Publication Subject Categories # of Pubs
  • AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE4
  • FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY2
  • VETERINARY SCIENCES2
  • BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES1
  • ZOOLOGY1

Most Recent Journal Articles

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  • Proudfoot, KL, Jensen, MB, Weary, DM, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Dairy cows seek isolation at calving and when ill." Journal of Dairy Science. Vol. 97, (May 2014): 2731-2739. (Published). Proudfoot, KL, Jensen, MB, Weary, DM, von Keyserlingk, MAG Dairy cows seek isolation at calving and when ill Journal of Dairy Science Journal Article Peer-Review
  • Proudfoot, KL, Weary, DM, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Maternal isolation behavior of Holstein dairy cows kept indoors." Journal of Animal Science. Vol. 92, (Jan 2014): 227-281. (Published).Citation Count: 1. Proudfoot, KL, Weary, DM, von Keyserlingk, MAG Maternal isolation behavior of Holstein dairy cows kept indoors Journal of Animal Science Journal Article Peer-Review The aim of this study was to determine if, and under what conditions, indoor-housed dairy cows would seek a shelter to calve. Seventy-two Holstein dairy cows were paired by expected calving date and moved into a maternity pen that contained an open area with no cover and a sheltered area that was covered on all sides except for the ceiling and an entrance where cows could freely enter or exit. Once the first cow of a pair calved ("pair-housed"), she was removed; the second cow remained in the pen until calving ("single-housed"). For both pair-and single-housed cows, location and time of calving was determined by video. For single-housed cows, use of each area in the 12 h before calving was measured, and for pair-housed cows, distance from partner during the 12 h before calving was measured. Single-housed cows were more likely to calve in the shelter but only when calving occurred during the day (P = 0.03). Pair-housed cows were more likely to calve in the open area, regardless of time of day (P = 0.02). Beginning about 8 h before calving, single-housed cows that calved in the shelter increased their use of the shelter, and pair-housed cows spent more time away from their partners (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). These results suggest that indoor-housed dairy cows prefer a shelter during calving but only when they were housed individually and when calving during the daytime. STRATEGIES|CATTLE|SITE SELECTION|PARTURITION|parturition|labor|calving management Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science Web of Science ®
  • Proudfoot, KL, Jensen, MB, Heegaard, RMH, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Effect of moving dairy cows at different stages of labor on behavior during parturition." Journal of Dairy Science. Vol. 96, no. 3. (Mar 2013): 1638-1646. (Published).Citation Count: 3. Proudfoot, KL, Jensen, MB, Heegaard, RMH, von Keyserlingk, MAG Effect of moving dairy cows at different stages of labor on behavior during parturition Journal of Dairy Science Journal Article Peer-Review 23332841 10.3168/jds.2012-6000 0022-0302 Cows are often moved from a group to an individual maternity pen just before calving. However, it is unclear whether moving cows during labor may alter their behavior or affect the progress of labor. The aim of this study was to determine if moving cows to a maternity pen at different stages of labor would influence calving behavior or the length of the second stage of labor. Seventy-nine multiparous Holstein dairy cows were moved from 1 of 2 group pens to 1 of 10 maternity pens adjacent to each group pen either 3 d before expected calving date or when one or more behavioral or physical signs of labor were observed. These signs were noted, and were used to retrospectively categorize cows into 1 of 3 movement categories: (1) moved before labor, (2) moved during early stage I labor (signs of suddenly tense and enlarged udder, raised tail or relaxed pelvic ligaments; could also be immediately prelabor), or (3) moved during late stage I labor (signs of viscous, bloody mucus or abdominal contractions; could also be transitioning to stage II labor). Calves were weighed within 12 h of birth and remained with their dam for 3 d. The length of the second stage of labor (the time between first abdominal contractions to the delivery the calf) and the total time of abdominal contractions, lying time, and number of position changes from standing to lying made by the cow in the hour before calving were recorded. A single blood sample was taken from the jugular vein of cows 3 to 27 h after calving to determine content of haptoglobin, a marker of systemic inflammation. The effect of movement category on length of the second stage of labor and behavioral variables was tested with ANOVA; category was a fixed effect and calf body weight (BW) and cow parity were covariates. The relationship between haptoglobin and the length of the second stage of labor was tested in a model with time of sampling relative to calving as a covariate. Cows moved during late stage I had the longest labor, but did not have longer contractions compared with cows in the other categories. These same cows spent half as much time lying in the 1 h before calving compared with cows in the other categories, but did not differ in the number of position changes from standing to lying. We did not have the power to test the effect of movement category on haptoglobin, but cows with longer stage II labor had higher haptoglobin postcalving. Moving cows to a maternity pen during the late part of the first stage of labor caused a delay in the second stage of labor, and this was likely driven by altered lying behavior. CATTLE|PROGRESS|ENVIRONMENTS|ACUTE-PHASE RESPONSE|HAPTOGLOBIN|PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSES|INDICATOR|SOWS|transition|parturition|labor|calving management Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science|Food Science & Technology Links
  • Proudfoot, KL, Weary, DM, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Invited review: Linking the social environment to illness in farm animals." Applied Animal Behaviour Science. Vol. 138, (Mar 2012): 203-215. (Published).Citation Count: 4. Proudfoot, KL, Weary, DM, von Keyserlingk, MAG Invited review: Linking the social environment to illness in farm animals Applied Animal Behaviour Science Review Peer-Review Disease is one of the single largest issues facing food animal agriculture today. Risk factors for various diseases in cattle, swine and chickens include aspects of both the physical and social environment. In this paper we review literature linking the social environment to illness in farm animals, drawing from a conceptual framework developed primarily in the human and laboratory animal literature. To date, researchers have identified various social determinants of disease, have linked social stressors to biological intermediaries and clinical signs of disease, and have established individual behavioural and neuroendocrine differences in susceptibility to disease. Further, ill animals reduce social behaviours as part of a suite of 'sickness behaviours'. In animal agriculture, the social environment is controlled by management practices implemented on individual farms. Globally, farm sizes are growing, but there is no clear link between farm size and disease incidence. Rather, researchers have tied specific grouping practices, such as moving cows between groups, to increased disease risk, and have begun to determine the biological chain connecting the social world to biological determinants of disease. Studies with farm animals have also established individual variation in behavioural and neuroendocrine response to these practices. Some individuals are more reactive to changes in their social environment than others; however, there remains no consensus on how to recognize these at-risk animals. Additionally, despite the potential role in disease detection, little farm animal work has investigated whether a reduction in social behaviours could be used as early predictors of disease. We end the review by urging further farm animal research to determine the relationship between the social environment and disease, utilizing the concepts and methodologies that have been developed in the human and laboratory animal literature. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. INDUCED SICKNESS BEHAVIOR|PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS|CELL-MEDIATED-IMMUNITY|INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES|RISK-FACTORS|PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS|INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES|DAIRY-COWS|BOVINE RESPIRATORY-DISEASE|IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS-DISEASE|health|social behaviour|immunity|sickness behaviour Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science|Behavioral Sciences|Veterinary Sciences Web of Science ®
  • Ryan, EB, Proudfoot, KL, Fraser, D. "The Effect of Feeding Enrichment Methods on the Behavior of Captive Western Lowland Gorillas." Zoo Biology. Vol. 31, no. 2. (Mar 2012): 235-241. (Published).Citation Count: 1. Ryan, EB, Proudfoot, KL, Fraser, D The Effect of Feeding Enrichment Methods on the Behavior of Captive Western Lowland Gorillas Zoo Biology Journal Article Peer-Review 21656848 10.1002/zoo.20403 0733-3188 Three feeding enrichment treatments were tested in an outdoor yard used by six Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). In "Yard-toss," forage was thrown by hand over one third of the yard. In "Set-up," forage and browse were hand-scattered throughout the yard. "Set-up Enriched" was similar with the addition of either a hay- and forage-filled feeder or forage-filled boomer ball(s) suspended from a climbing structure. Each treatment was presented on 5 d. Behavior was recorded for 30 min before (baseline) and 30 min after the start of each treatment. All treatments led to more foraging and less inactivity compared with baseline (P<0.05), but Yard-toss was the least effective, likely because resources were clumped and monopolized by dominant animals. In Set-up Enriched, dominant animals had the greatest increase in foraging (P=0.03), partly because they generally monopolized the suspended items, but this allowed others to forage at ground level. This separation of the animals likely explains why Set-Up Enriched led to more foraging than all other treatments (P<0.05). Findings show that for these hierarchical animals, enrichment resources are most effective when distributed widely, including vertically, and that enrichment strategies must take social structure into account. Zoo Biol 31: 235-241, 2012. (c) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. CHIMPANZEES|FOOD|gorilla|foraging behavior|environmental enrichment|resource defense Veterinary Sciences|Zoology Links

Most Recent Conference Papers & Proceedings

  • Proudfoot, KL, Jensen, MB, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Maternity pen design and management from the cow’s perspective." In: Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Conference. 30. Editor-Review] (Published). Proudfoot, KL, Jensen, MB, von Keyserlingk, MAG Maternity pen design and management from the cow’s perspective Conference Proceeding Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Conference Editor-Review 1 Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Conference
  • Proudfoot, KL, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Trends in animal welfare research." In: Proceedings of Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council Annual Meeting. Indianapolis: DCRC. 2. Peer-Review] (Published). Proudfoot, KL, von Keyserlingk, MAG Trends in animal welfare research Conference Proceeding Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council Annual Meeting Peer-Review 3 2013 DCRC Annual Meeting Proceedings and Presentations DCRC
  • Jensen, MB, Proudfoot, KL, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Using behavior to improve housing and management around the time of calving." In: Proceedings of Western Canadian Dairy Seminar. Red Deer: WCDS. 63. (Published). Jensen, MB, Proudfoot, KL, von Keyserlingk, MAG Using behavior to improve housing and management around the time of calving Conference Proceeding Western Canadian Dairy Seminar 3 WCDS Advances in Dairy Technology WCDS
  • Proudfoot, KL, von Keyserlingk, MAG. "Optimizing the transition cow environment: implications for behavior and health." In: Proceedings of Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council Annual Meeting. St. Paul: DCRC. 87. Peer-Review] (Published). Proudfoot, KL, von Keyserlingk, MAG Optimizing the transition cow environment: implications for behavior and health Conference Proceeding Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council Annual Meeting Peer-Review 3 Proceedings of Dairy Cattle Reproduction Conference DCRC

Most Recent Scholarly Presentations

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  • Proudfoot, KL, Presenter. "Maternity pen design and management from the cow’s perspective." Presented at Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin Annual Business Meeting, Madison, Wisconsin, United States. (Mar 2015) Proudfoot, KL Maternity pen design and management from the cow’s perspective Presenter Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin Annual Business Meeting National
  • Proudfoot,KL, Presenter. "Reading your cows' cues." Presented at Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin Annual Business Meeting Madison, Wisconsin, United States. (Mar 2015) Proudfoot,KL Reading your cows' cues Presenter Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin Annual Business Meeting Madison National
  • Proudfoot, KL, Presenter. "Behavior and management of transition cows: a focus on maternity housing." Presented at Alberta Milk Transition Cow Workshop Edmonton, AB, Alberta, Canada. (Feb 2015) Proudfoot, KL Behavior and management of transition cows: a focus on maternity housing Presenter Alberta Milk Transition Cow Workshop Edmonton, AB International
  • Proudfoot, KL, Presenter. "Cow comfort and lameness." Presented at Danish Dairy Cattle Congress, Hobro, Denmark. (Feb 2015) Proudfoot, KL Cow comfort and lameness Presenter Danish Dairy Cattle Congress International
  • Proudfoot, KL, Presenter. "Using animal behavior as an early predictor of illness." Presented at Danish Dairy Cattle Congress Hobro, Denmark. (Feb 2015) Proudfoot, KL Using animal behavior as an early predictor of illness Presenter Danish Dairy Cattle Congress Hobro International