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Antoinette Elisa Marsh

  • Associate Professor, Veterinary Preventive Medicine
    The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Veterinary Preventive Medicine
    The Ohio State University
  • Most Common Publication Keywords # of Pubs
  • ACTIVATION1
  • APICOMPLEXA1
  • ASSAY1
  • BINDING PROTEIN1
  • CALVES1
  • CATTLE1
  • COCCIDIA1
  • CRIA1
  • CURRICULUM1
  • DAM1
  • Most Common Publication Subject Categories # of Pubs
  • VETERINARY SCIENCES3
  • AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE1
  • PARASITOLOGY1

Most Recent Journal Articles

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  • Sinnott, D, Moreno Torres, K, Wolfe, B, Garabed, R, Marsh, AE. "Detection of Hammondia heydorni DNA in feces collected in and around an Ohio Wildlife Conservation Center." Veterinary Parasitology: Regional Studies and Reports. Vol. 6, (Dec 2016): 31-34. (Published). Sinnott, D, Moreno Torres, K, Wolfe, B, Garabed, R, Marsh, AE Detection of Hammondia heydorni DNA in feces collected in and around an Ohio Wildlife Conservation Center Veterinary Parasitology: Regional Studies and Reports Journal Article Peer-Review Designed parasite analysis and mentored student in the laboratory. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vprsr.2016.08.003 DOI
  • Pentecost,Rebecca,L; Marsh,Antoinette,E; Niehaus,Andrew,J; et al. "Vertical transmission of Mycoplasma haemolamae in alpacas (Vicugna pacos)." SMALL RUMINANT RESEARCH. Vol. 106, no. 2-3. (Aug 2012): 181-188. (Published).Citation Count: 1. Pentecost,Rebecca,L; Marsh,Antoinette,E; Niehaus,Andrew,J; Daleccio,Jackeline; Daniels,Joshua,B; Rajala-Schultz,Paivi,J; Lakritz,Jeffrey Vertical transmission of Mycoplasma haemolamae in alpacas (Vicugna pacos) SMALL RUMINANT RESEARCH Journal Article Peer-Review 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2012.02.021 0921-4488 The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of vertical transmission of Mycoplasma haemolamae from dam to cria, whether colostral transmission of M. haemolamae occurs and provide preliminary data on colostral M. haemolamae specific antibody from pregnant alpacas on a farm with known prevalence of infection. M. haemolamae specific PCR was performed on blood and colostrum from pregnant alpacas and their cria (n = 52 pairs). Indirect fluorescent antibody testing was performed on a subset (n = 43) of the colostrum samples. Total immunoglobulin concentrations of colostrum and cria sera and M. haemolamae specific IgG (prior to and after ingesting colostrum) were determined by turbidometric immunoassay and indirect fluorescence antibody testing respectively. Sixteen of 52 dams (30.7%) pre-partum and one of 52 cria post-partum (1.9%; prior to ingesting colostrum) were PCR positive for M. haemolamae, while 36/52 dams (69%) and 51/52 cria (98%) tested negative for M. haemolamae by PCR. All 43 colostrum samples and 52 of 52 post-colostrum cria blood samples (100%) were negative by PCR. The dam giving birth to the M. haemolamae PCR positive cria was PCR negative. Statistically, it was no more likely for a PCR positive dam to give birth to a M. haemolamae, PCR positive cria (prior to colostrum ingestion) than a PCR negative dam (p = 0.3077). M. haemolamae specific IgG was present in 22 of 43 (51%) of colostrum samples at a 1:10 dilution and 14 of 22 (64%) at a 1:100 dilution. There was no relationship between the PCR status of the dam and whether or not M. haemolamae specific antibodies were present in colostrum. Among the animals tested, in utero transmission of M. haemolamae was rare (1/52 pre-colostral alpaca cria), and all colostrum samples were negative for M. haemolamae by PCR. These data indicate that colostrum from positive dams is unlikely to harbor this parasite and therefore does not serve as a source of infection to newborn cria. Colostrum derived from both PCR positive and negative dams contained M. haemolamae specific antibodies. Our findings suggest that M. haemolamae specific antibodies may play a role in immunity to this hemoparasite; however, challenge studies are necessary to fully evaluate the role of M. haemolamae specific antibodies. Furthermore, antibody prevalence and detectable titers may provide different estimates than those available from current PCR based prevalence studies. Our findings also suggest that M. haemolamae isolates from geographically distinct regions do not differ significantly from each other. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. PREVALENCE|INFECTION|POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION|NEOSPORA-CANINUM|IMMUNOGLOBULIN-G|ASSAY|LLAMAS|LAMA-PACOS|SOUTH-AMERICAN CAMELIDS|EPERYTHROZOONOSIS|PCR|IgG|dam|IFAT|cria|Mycoplasma haemolamae Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science Links
  • Marsh, AE. "Paw and Order: Using animal DNA as forensic evidence is not yet ready for prime time." Journal of Animal Law and Ethics. Vol. 3, (Sep 2009): 53-84. (Published). Marsh, AE Paw and Order: Using animal DNA as forensic evidence is not yet ready for prime time Journal of Animal Law and Ethics Journal Article Peer-Review
  • Babcock,Sarah; Marsh,Antoinette,E; Lin,Jeanie; et al. "Legal implications of zoonoses for clinical veterinarians." JAVMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. Vol. 233, no. 10. (Nov 2008): 1556-1562. (Published).Citation Count: 8. Babcock,Sarah; Marsh,Antoinette,E; Lin,Jeanie; Scott,John Legal implications of zoonoses for clinical veterinarians JAVMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Journal Article Peer-Review 19014288 0003-1488 As human and animal populations increase, the need for veterinarians to serve as leaders in the prevention of and response to zoonotic diseases has never been greater. Zoonoses are defined as diseases that may be directly or indirectly transmitted from wild or domestic animals to humans.(1,2) Of the 1,461 diseases now recognized in humans, approximately 60% are caused by pathogens classified as zoonotic on the basis of their ability to move across species lines.' Over the past 30 years, approximately 75% of new emerging infectious diseases have been zoonotic.(4) Recognition by the public that infectious disease outbreaks in people can often be attributed to animal contact reinforces the need to educate veterinarians on zoonotic diseases, the role veterinarians play in preventing zoonoses, and the legal liabilities associated with these roles and responsibilities. The role veterinarians play in public health issues associated with zoonotic agents and human health is evolving, necessitating a closer look at the ethical and legal responsibilities of veterinarians in regard to zoonotic diseases, as well as the legal repercussions that may be associated with a failure to act. The present report provides an introduction to some of the challenging issues veterinary practitioners may face in this regard. DISEASES|CURRICULUM|MEDICINE|PARASITES|STATE-UNIVERSITY|PUBLIC-HEALTH EDUCATION|DEGREE PROGRAM Veterinary Sciences Links
  • Crowdus,Carolyn,A; Marsh,Antoinette,E; Saville,Willliam,J; et al. "SnSAG5 is an alternative surface antigen of Sarcocystis neurona strains that is mutually exclusive to SnSAG1." VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY. Vol. 158, no. 1-2. (Nov 2008): 36-43. (Published).Citation Count: 7. Crowdus,Carolyn,A; Marsh,Antoinette,E; Saville,Willliam,J; Lindsay,David,S; Dubey,J,P; Granstrom,David,E; Howe,Daniel,K SnSAG5 is an alternative surface antigen of Sarcocystis neurona strains that is mutually exclusive to SnSAG1 VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY Journal Article Peer-Review 18829171 10.1016/j.vetpar.2008.08.012 0304-4017 Sarcocystis neurona is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Previous work has identified a gene family of paralogous surface antigens in S. neurona called SnSAGs. These surface proteins are immunogenic in their host animals, and are therefore candidate molecules for development of diagnostics and vaccines. However, SnSAG diversity exists in strains of S. neurona, including the absence of the major surface antigen gene SnSAG1. Instead, sequence for an alternative SnSAG has been revealed in two of the SnSAG I-deficient strains. Herein, we present data characterizing this new surface protein, which we have designated SnSAG5. The results indicated that the protein encoded by the SnSAG5 sequence is indeed a surface-associated molecule that has characteristics consistent with the other SAGs identified in S. neurona and related parasites. Importantly, Western blot analyses of a collection of S. neurona strains demonstrated that 6 of 13 parasite isolates express SnSAG5 as a dominant surface protein instead of SnSAG1. Conversely, SnSAG5 was not detected in SnSAG1-positive strains. One strain, which was isolated from the brain of a sea otter, did not express either SnSAG1 or SnSAG5. Genetic analysis with SnSAG5-specific primers confirmed the presence of the SnSAG5 gene in Western blot-positive strains, while also suggesting the presence of a novel SnSAG sequence in the SnSAG1-deficient, SnSAG5-deficient otter isolate. The findings provide further indication of S. neurona strain diversity, which has implications for diagnostic testing and development of vaccines against EPM as well as the population biology of Sarcocystis cycling in the opossum definitive host. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. EQUINE PROTOZOAL MYELOENCEPHALITIS|FAMILY|TOXOPLASMA-GONDII|PLASMODIUM-FALCIPARUM|SERUM|PROTEINS|FLUORESCENT-ANTIBODY TEST|MEROZOITES|ENHYDRA-LUTRIS|SEA OTTER|vaccine|apicomplexa|coccidia|diagnosis|Sarcocystis|equine protozoal myeloencephalitis|strain diversity Parasitology|Veterinary Sciences Links

Most Recent Conference Papers & Proceedings

  • Marsh, AE, Rhodes-DiSalvo, M, and Bremer, C. "Teaching Diagnostic Parasitology: Results on Giardia and the Telephone Game." In: Conference Proceedings. 1. Peer-Review] (Published). Marsh, AE, Rhodes-DiSalvo, M, and Bremer, C Teaching Diagnostic Parasitology: Results on Giardia and the Telephone Game Conference Proceeding American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists Peer-Review 1 Conference Proceedings Designed, executed and preformed analysis on educational exercise. Wrote abstract.
  • Sinnott, D, Moreno Torres, K, Wolfe, B, Garabed, R, Marsh, AE. "Detection of Hammondia heydorni oocysts in wild and domestic canid feces." In: Proceedings of American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists. San Antonio: AAVP. 1. Peer-Review] (Published). Sinnott, D, Moreno Torres, K, Wolfe, B, Garabed, R, Marsh, AE Detection of Hammondia heydorni oocysts in wild and domestic canid feces. Conference Proceeding American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists Peer-Review 3 Conference Proceedings AAVP Designed, supervised performance and analyzed detection of parasites by molecular-based assays.
  • Zitzer, N., Marsh, AE, Burkhard, MJ, Radin, JM, Wellman, M, Jugan, M, Parker V. "Detection of circulating Sarcocystis sp. in a cat with FIV." In: Conference Proceedings. a. Peer-Review] (Published). Zitzer, N., Marsh, AE, Burkhard, MJ, Radin, JM, Wellman, M, Jugan, M, Parker V Detection of circulating Sarcocystis sp. in a cat with FIV Conference Proceeding American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists Peer-Review 1 Conference Proceedings Designed, performed and analyzed detection of parasite by molecular-based assays.
  • Inpanbutr, N, Marsh, AE, Rhodes-DiSalvo, M, Richards, J, Reddish, JM, Masty, J. "Using ExamSoft for Practical and Written Exams in Anatomy and Parasitology: Part 1." In: Proceedings of Veterinary Educator Collaborative. Canada: Calgary. 00. Peer-Review] (Published). Inpanbutr, N, Marsh, AE, Rhodes-DiSalvo, M, Richards, J, Reddish, JM, Masty, J. Using ExamSoft for Practical and Written Exams in Anatomy and Parasitology: Part 1 Conference Paper Veterinary Educator Collaborative Peer-Review 3 Meeting Proceedings Calgary Designed assessment, collected and analyzed data. Written analysis included into abstract. Abstract published in proceedings.
  • Zitzer, N., Marsh, AE, Burkhard, MJ, Radin, JM, Wellman, M, Jugan, M, Parker V. "Mystery Slide." In: Proceedings of American Scoeity of Veterinary Clinical Pathology. 0: American Society of Veterinary Clinical Pathologists. 0. Peer-Review] (Published). Zitzer, N., Marsh, AE, Burkhard, MJ, Radin, JM, Wellman, M, Jugan, M, Parker V Mystery Slide Conference Proceeding American Scoeity of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Peer-Review 3 Conference Proceedings American Society of Veterinary Clinical Pathologists Assisted resident in initial identification of parasite, including specialized staining.

Most Recent Scholarly Presentations

  • Antoinette Marsh, Seminar Presenter. "Mycoplasma haemolamae." Presented at Missouri Spring Camelid Update Long Meadow Rescue Ranch, Union, Missouri, United States. (May 2016) Antoinette Marsh Mycoplasma haemolamae Seminar Presenter 3 Missouri Spring Camelid Update Long Meadow Rescue Ranch State Present a seminar on clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and comparative biological features of Mycoplasma haemolamae in camelids.
  • Antoinette Marsh, Lecturer. "Barbervax in Camelids." Presented at Camelid Conference for Owners and Breeders, Other. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States. (Mar 2016) Antoinette Marsh Barbervax in Camelids Lecturer 3 Camelid Conference for Owners and Breeders The Ohio State University Regional Presentation to owners on the problems with vaccine development, merits of a new vaccine for Haemonchus contortus, and the unusual antibodies found in camelids.
  • Antoinette Marsh, Lecturer. "Camelid Parasitology: Looking at Other Models for Applications to Camelids." Presented at International Camelid Health Conference for Veterinarians, Other. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States. (Mar 2016) Antoinette Marsh Camelid Parasitology: Looking at Other Models for Applications to Camelids Lecturer 3 International Camelid Health Conference for Veterinarians The Ohio State University International Presentation of data on Barbervax, a new vaccine used for the control of Haemonchus contortus
  • Antoinette Marsh, Presenter. "Zoonotic Disease Transmission in Veterinary Practices." Presented at AVMA, Peers within Field. Convention Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States. (Jul 2015) Antoinette Marsh Zoonotic Disease Transmission in Veterinary Practices. Presenter AVMA Public Health Convention Center National Wrote proceedings and presented topic
  • Antoinette Marsh, Presenter. "Legal Implication of Zoonotic Disease Transmission for Veterinary Practices." Presented at Midwest Veterinary Conference, Peers within Field. Convention Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States. (Feb 2014) Antoinette Marsh Legal Implication of Zoonotic Disease Transmission for Veterinary Practices Presenter 3 Midwest Veterinary Conference Public Health Convention Center Regional Researched the material. Wrote the abstract and powerpoint presentation materials.